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Women on Boards

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Women on Boards

The Davies Report: Women on Boards Feb 2011

In 2010 women made up only 12.5% of the members of the corporate boards of FTSE 100 companies and Lord Davies of Abersoch was asked by the Government to investigate the barriers preventing women from reaching senior decision making roles in business, including at the boardroom level. Women on Boards, published in February 2011, highlighted the low numbers of women reaching the top and set a goal of 25% representation by 2015.

The Davies Report outlined the business case:

Women are successful at university and in their early careers, but attrition rates increase as they progress through an organisation. When women are so under-represented on corporate boards, companies are missing out, as they are unable to draw from the widest possible range of talent. Evidence suggests that companies with a strong female representation at board and top management level perform better than those without and that gender-diverse boards have a positive impact on performance. It is clear that boards make better decisions where a range of voices, drawing on different life experiences, can be heard. That mix of voices must include women.”

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Progress in the UK: The Davies Report annual update 2014

The Davies report annual update 2014 states women’s representation on FTSE 100 boards now stands at 20.7%, up from 12.5% in 2011, with only two all male boards remaining. The FTSE 250 has achieved 15.6%, up from 7.8% in 2011.

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The Government Equalities Office: Think, Act, Report 2 years on

British businesses said they could fix this on their own and didn’t want legislation or quotas. Many organisations have since signed up to the Government’s Think, Act, Report scheme, which aims to ensure that all women reach their potential in the workplace. Progress has been made, but according to the recent Davies review the goal of 25% representation by 2015 will not be reached without business re-doubling efforts.

Despite progress in the Boardroom, there are still very few women CEO’s representing some 5% of the FTSE 100. The focus now needs to be on strengthening the executive pipeline. At The Glass Lift we support businesses to achieve these aims by developing the next generation of women leaders.

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Women on Boards in the European Union

From The European Commission: ‘Women and men in leadership positions in the European Union, 2013. A review of the situation and recent progress’.

The European Commission view the under-representation of women in corporate decision-making as representing a significant economic cost to companies and to the economy as a whole at a time when Europe needs to fully exploit the talents of all parts of the workforce in order to ensure growth and ensure competitiveness.”

Women on Boards in the European Union

From The European Commission:  ‘Women and men in leadership positions in the European Union, 2013. A review of the situation and recent progress’.

The European Commission view the under-representation of women in corporate decision-making as representing a significant economic cost to companies and to the economy as a whole at a time when Europe needs to fully exploit the talents of all parts of the workforce in order to ensure growth and ensure competitiveness.”

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